Makerere Lecturer Who Set Funny Law Exam on Speaker Among Speaks Out On Probe

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Dr Busingye Kabumba, the Makerere University Law lecturer believed to have set a controversial satirical constitutional exam on Speaker of Parliament Anita Among has spoken out about investigations against him.

The constitutional law expert, who teaches “principles of constitutional law” to first-year law students at the University, said in a social media post that: “academic freedom is a right specially protected under Article 29 (1) (b) of the 1995 Constitution” and that “it deserves and will receive jealous protection.”

Dr. Kabumba’s statement comes on the heels of a directive by Makerere University Vice Chancellor Prof. Barnabas Nawangwe to the School of Law’s Principal Assoc. Prof. Ronald Naluwairo to “call an emergency meeting of the school Academic Board to investigate the above captioned [exam] paper.”

Prof. Nawangwe in his directive instructed the Principal to specifically find out “whether the paper meets the minimum academic standards of Makerere as a premier University” and “whether there are ethical issues that fall below expected standards.”


Prof Barnabas Nawangwe
Prof. Nawangwe in his directive instructed the Principal to specifically find out “whether the paper meets the minimum academic standards of Makerere as a premier University”/ Photo: The Independent

“ Please investigate also the past three papers set by the same examiner. You are required to submit a report to the chairperson of Senate for discussion at the meeting of Senate on 21st May 2024.” Prof. Nawangwe writes.

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On 11th May,  just 10 days after the UK government imposed sanctions on “corrupt” Ugandan politicians including Speaker Anita Among, Dr. Busingye Kabumba’s first-year law students sat the said controversial exam where one of the questions was an uncanny problem question for the students to “discuss all the constitutional law issues raised by the above scenario.”

Other than the UK sanctions, the question, in a humorous way, hinted at the threats against social media activists behind the “Uganda Parliament Exhibition” campaign, the Speaker’s ostensibly dictatorial conduct of Parliamentary proceedings, and a nepotistic and dictatorial presidency.  

“ Stung by the recent sanctions imposed on her by the government of the United Kingdom (UK) and the social media criticism which followed, Speaker of Parliament, Rt. Hon Anita Annet Among has decided to fight back against those “writing malicious reports” about her. Thus, on Monday, May 6th, 2024 she introduced what she called a “Speaker’s Bill” which contains the following provisions, inter alia:

  1. No person shall adversely comment on the office of the Speaker of Parliament and in particular on the person of Anita Annet Among;
  2. Any person who violates the above provision commits an offense against the people of Uganda and will be summarily sentenced by a new Special Anti-Social Media (SPAM) tribunal to a term of five years in jail with no option for bail and
  3. The Speaker will make recommendations to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) on which individuals should be charged under the law.”

The question read in part.


Speaker Anita Among
Dr. Busingye Kabumba’s first-year law students sat the said controversial exam 10 days after Speaker Anita Among was sanctioned. /Photo: The Observer

“ That afternoon, the Speaker took the Bill to President Museveni for his assent. In response, the President told the Speaker, “This is a very good Bill, it only misses specific mention of me as the fountain of honour, Maama Janet, the First Lady and all my children: let me add that clause in and sign.” The question read in another part.

It is not new for lecturers at Makerere University to frame exam questions in a manner that tests students on real-world situations and this approach is widely believed to ensure their education is relevant to the society in which they live.

However, in all cases – as seen by this writer, the names of the subjects or actors in such problem questions have been significantly changed (as it is done in the movies) unlike in this situation and the students’ focus has been directed to issues of “fact” so that they apply legal principles to those issues of “fact” albeit in a relatable way.



As one social media user commented:

“ Using false names for the Speaker and the President as it was done for the social media activists would not have subtracted anything from that Law School question. In fact, it would have probably added something. Maybe that’s the moderation that Nawangwe is talking about.”



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